About us

Hilary Smith
(Director)
MA, Dip TESL, PhD

Download a CV here.

Hilary Smith has an applied linguistics in education background, with over 30 years of teaching and researching in New Zealand, the Pacific and Southeast Asia. She has lived in Tonga, Papua Guinea, and Lao PDR, and has also worked in Indonesia, Kiribati, Vanuatu, and Solomon Islands. She has carried out shorter term projects in Nepal, Thailand, and Timor-Leste.

Hilary's academic focus is on education in multilingual and developing country contexts, with particular expertise in English language education, and innovative methods for measuring attitudes. 

Hilary also has a particular interest in organisational development and leadership of non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and monitoring and development (M&E) for NGOs. She has had a long involvement with New Zealand's international volunteer sending organisation VSA (Te Tūao Tāwāhi Volunteer Service Abroad), including serving as national Chair for nine years, and is one of six life members. She is the immediate past president of the professional organisation TESOLANZ (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages).

She is engaged in language policy issues, particularly in relation to education. See here for an interview in a newspaper article exploring the increasing diversity in New Zealand schools.

She is Honorary Research Fellow in the School of Humanities at Massey University, Palmerston North.

 

Hilary with Momoe Sugano and Nanami Warasina, Azuma Elementary School, Japan

In Canberra, Hilary is an Honorary Affiliate of the College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University. She is also an Affiliate of the Australian Research Council funded Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language (COEDL), based at the Australian National University, and is working on the revival of the Gamilaraay language of northern New South Wales.

She writes an irregular blog about her adventures in language: Language Alive!

Stephen Haslett
(Director)
BSc, BA (Hons), PhD, CStat, FSS

Download a CV here.

Stephen Haslett is a Chartered Statistician and Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society. He has over 35 years of experience in the design and evaluation of national sample surveys in a range of countries from Azerbaijan to Nepal, Vietnam and Uganda, but also including smaller Pacific nations such as Kiribati, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Samoa, and Vanuatu.

Steve's involvement in Systemetrics has been combined with his responsibilities at Massey University, New Zealand, where he is an Emeritus Professor of Statistics.

He was the 2010 recipient of the New Zealand Statistical Association's Campbell Award, has held a Senior Fellowship at the National Science Foundation - American Statistical Association, and has held visiting professorial positions at Iowa State University and Trinity College, Dublin.

Steve has been the Editor in Chief/Managing Editor of the Australia and New Zealand Journal of Statistics, President of the New Zealand Statistical Association, and principal investigator and reviewer for the Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fund. He has published over 100 academic papers, but he also has a very practical side. Along with his theoretic research in mathematical statistics, he has published over 100 research and consulting reports. These range from small projects to larger ones for multinational agencies, and include extensive advice in the Pacific and Southeast and Central Asian region governments on statistical methods and protocols.


Steve with novice monks, Khujula Lhakhang Monastery, Bhutan

Steve has a particular interest in small area estimation of poverty and malnutrition, and has been involved in national projects that use statistical modelling to get better, finer level estimates from existing data sources in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines and Timor-Leste. To see a feature article about his work from Massey University's Defining NZ Magazine, click here.

He is currently Director of the Statistical Consulting Unit at Australian National University, Canberra.

 

 

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